Archive for October 2015

Legal developments in construction law

We are delighted to share our latest Construction Legal Update.

Key topics in this update include:

Current issues
1. Application, application, application (for payment) – but is it?
2. The work is done but does that mean there was a contract?
3. An arbitrator knows best – at least on the facts
4. New expert panel to make planning go faster
5. UK business with £36 million plus turnover? Modern slavery reporting on the way
6. And now we have a National Infrastructure Commission

The update can be accessed here.

UK Employment Law

Episode 80The View from Mayer Brown

Nick looks at a Court of Appeal decision and whether the Protection from Harassment Act covers individuals who are directly affected by harassment but they are not the intended target. The second considers whether employees who were temporarily laid off transferred with the business to a new employer under the Transfer Regulations. The third case considers what is required for a whistleblower to show the disclosure is “in the public interest”. To follow Nick on Twitter, please go to Nicholas Robertson@NicholasRober11 to receive links to all the cases mentioned.

(If you're having trouble playing the podcast, please download it.)

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Financial Dispute Resolution

Episode 6The View from Mayer Brown

Follow the money; this month Ed Sautter looks at how banks chasing mistaken payments got some further ammunition and how backward tracing was successfully invoked in order to pursue the proceeds of bribes from Brazil to the Channel Islands.

(If you're having trouble playing the podcast, please download it.)

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UK Employment Law

Episode 79The View from Mayer Brown

In this podcast Nick looks at three recent cases. The first one looks at the possibility of an associative discrimination claim and Nick looks at what this concept would mean for employers. The second case determines that an limited liability company can sue for direct discrimination. Thirdly we have a helpful case providing guidance on the various EU wide rules on jurisdiction which apply where an employer wishes to sue an employee. To follow Nick on Twitter, please go to Nicholas Robertson@NicholasRober11 to receive links to all the cases mentioned.

(If you're having trouble playing the podcast, please download it.)

To keep a record of what you have listened to, please register here.